Dragon's Dogma 2 patches will add console ray-tracing, improve frame rate & fix bugs

Dragon's Dogma 2 patches will add console ray-tracing, improve frame rate & fix bugs
Images via Capcom

Written by 

Tom Chapman

Published 

25th Mar 2024 13:19

It's been a good run for fantasy RPGs, and after Elden Ring started the ball rolling again in 2022, 2023 belonged to Baldur's Gate 3. We've only just started 2024, but already, Dragon's Dogma 2 is coming for the crown in 2024. Capcom is aiming for bigger and better in the sequel, and it's not waiting around. 

Despite only launching on March 22, Dragon's Dogma 2 has had something of a baptism of fire. While the bones of a great title seem to be there, it's been marred by complaints of microtransactions, performance issues, bugs, and more. Even though the game's Steam reviews are pretty dicey, Capcom promises to turn things around. 

Capcom promises to do better with Dragon's Dogma 2

It's fair to say that Dragon's Dogma 2 is a bit of a mess in terms of performance right now. While it's not quite up there with a disastrous launch like Cyberpunk 2077, it's clear that Capcom could've let things cook for a little longer. Patches and fixes are apparently on the way, with devs thanking fans for their patience.

Considering some of you are already committing mass genocide on your NPCs in an attempt to boost performance, the denizens of Vermund and Battahl are likely sighing a sigh of relief right now. Capcom has confirmed that NPCs are individually simulated by your CPU, meaning you need a high-end PC to run it. 

A big win is ray-tracing on new-gen consoles, as well as improving quality when DLSS Super Resolution is enabled. Still, there are worries that updates won't be able to fix everything, especially as Dragon's Dogma 2 was developed with the RE Engine, which handles linear games rather than massive open-world adventures. 

There's no news on when these updates will be rolled out, but it's clear Capcom is keen to tackle things as soon as possible. Some are calling for a performance mode to hit that sweet 60 FPS, although it's unclear whether Capcom will go for it. In the meantime, modders have already added DLSS 3.0 to improve things themselves.

The microtransaction problem

Dragon's Dogma 2 Microtransactions
Click to enlarge
Image via Steam

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While it's great that the developer has its own roadmap for tweaks and improvements, it's unlikely to budge on arguably its most important issue. Many feel they were sold a dream with Dragon's Dogma 2, unaware it would shove microtransactions down our throats at every turn. Seriously, paying for fast travel!?!

It's all well and good focusing on getting Dragon's Dogma feeling like a new-gen title, but Capcom has already dodged the microtransaction debacle, giving a frustratingly weak response of simply highlighting what can be bought.

Capcom was bold to lean into microtransactions so hard, and when a game costs $70 as a base, it's a decision that's seemingly backfired. Still, if Dragon's Dogma 2 can fire on all cylinders and justify its own price tag, there's a chance we can still turn it around. Come on Capcom, we have faith. 

Tom is Trending News Editor at GGRecon, with an NCTJ qualification in Broadcast Journalism and over seven years of experience writing about film, gaming, and television. With bylines at IGN, Digital Spy, Den of Geek, and more, Tom’s love of horror means he's well-versed in all things Resident Evil, with aspirations to be the next Chris Redfield.

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